Category: Coding / Operating Systems

Finding the NUMA Node of a Nvidia CUDA GPU in Linux

For some applications it might be useful to pin their CPU processes to the NUMA node which is connected to the GPU. To find out which GPU is located at which NUMA node one can use the following script:

for i in $(nvidia-smi -x -q | grep "gpu id" | awk -F "\"" '{print $2}' | awk -F ":" '{print "0000:"  $2 ":"  $3}' | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]'); do echo $i; cat "/sys/bus/pci/devices/$i/numa_node"; done

Pinning the CPU process to the right NUMA node can speed up your application significantly on all Nvidia GPUs like the double precision HPC GPUs Tesla V100, A100 and A10, the professional Quadro RTX GPUs as well as all CUDA capable GeForce GPUs.

Quick Look plugins for software development

Quick Look already supports multiple file types. But there ist more – especially for software development. Here are some plugins that make Quick Look even better.

Note: some of the plugins might not work instantly after brew install ... when you are on macOS Catalina or later. In this case, it is possible to download the plugin manually and copy the .qlgenerator file to ~/Library/QuickLook. This requires to run qlmanage -r (or a system restart) to enable the plugin.

QLMarkdown

QLMarkdown provides QuickLook support for markdown files (*.md). This plugin renders the markdown content and shows the result. To install QLMarkdown, use:

brew cask install qlmarkdown

For manual installation, the plugin is available at https://github.com/toland/qlmarkdown.

QLStephen

This Quick Look plugin provides a file preview for files without extension, e.g. README, INSTALL, Capfile, CHANGELOG, etc. It can be installed using Homebrew:

brew cask install qlstephen

For manual installation, the plugin is available at https://github.com/whomwah/qlstephen.

QLColorCode

This is a Quick Look plug-in that renders source code with syntax highlighting. To install the plugin, use Homebrew:

brew cask install qlcolorcode

For manual installation, the plugin is available at https://github.com/anthonygelibert/QLColorCode. If you want to configure QLColorCode, there are several defaults commands that are described on the download page.

Quick Look Json

This is a Quick Look plug-in that renders json files. To install the plugin, use Homebrew:

brew cask install quicklook-json

For manual installation, the plugin is available at http://www.sagtau.com/quicklookjson.html.

WebP QuickLook

This is an open-source QuickLook plugin to generate thumbnails and previews for WebP images. To install the plugin, use Homebrew:

brew install webpquicklook

For manual installation, the plugin is available at https://github.com/dchest/webp-quicklook.

Something is missing? Please let me know in the comments, if there are any other plugins that might be helpful for software development.

Photo by Shane Aldendorff on Unsplash

Create certificate for localhost domains on macOS

Step 1: create a self-signed root certificate

First, let’s create a self-signed root certificate:

openssl req -x509 -nodes -new -sha256 -days 390 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout "RootCA.key" -out "RootCA.pem" -subj "/C=de/CN=localhost.local"
openssl x509 -outform pem -in "RootCA.pem" -out "RootCA.crt"

The parameter -days 390 sets the number of days, this certificate is valid. Starting on September 1st (2020), SSL/TLS certificates cannot be issued for longer than 13 months (397 days), see https://stackoverflow.com/a/65239775.

If this time is too long, you will receive an NET::ERR_CERT_VALIDITY_TOO_LONG error. In the command above, this value was set to 390 days, which works for me.

Step 2: define domains and subdomains that should be included in the certificate

For this, just create a text file named vhosts_domains.ext and insert the following contents:

authorityKeyIdentifier=keyid,issuer
basicConstraints=CA:FALSE
keyUsage = digitalSignature, nonRepudiation, keyEncipherment, dataEncipherment
subjectAltName = @alt_names
[alt_names]
DNS.1 = localhost
DNS.2 = *.mixable.blog.local
DNS.3 = mixable.blog.local

This example includes subdomains for a local development environment for the domain mixable.blog.local and all subdomains like www.mixable.blog.local or apps.mixable.blog.local.

If you plan to use a more general certificate e.g. to include all subdomains under *.*.blog.local, this will not work. The definition only supports ‘first level’ subdomains. It would be great, because this saves a lot of additional setup, but unfortunately this is note supported.

Step 3: create the certificate

Now let’s create the certificate:

openssl req -new -nodes -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout localhost.key -out localhost.csr -subj "/C=de/ST=State/L=City/O=Organization/CN=localhost.local"
openssl x509 -req -sha256 -days 1024 -in localhost.csr -CA RootCA.pem -CAkey RootCA.key -CAcreateserial -extfile vhosts_domains.ext -out localhost.crt

Calling the two commands above will create the localhost certificate that includes all the provided domains and subdomains. Your file listing should look like this:

Step 4: make the certificate available for Apache

Depending on your system, copy all those files into the the configuration folder of the Apache installation. In my case, the installation was done with the help of brew, so the local path is:

/usr/local/etc/httpd/cert/

At the end, it’s not important where those files are located, because we no add this path to the vhost definitions. For this, open your vhosts file and link the crt and the key file as follows:

# mixable.blog.local
<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerAdmin webmaster@example.com
    DocumentRoot "/Users/mathias/Sites/mixable.blog.local"
    ServerName mixable.blog.local
    ServerAlias mixable.blog.local
    ErrorLog "/usr/local/var/log/httpd/localhost-error.log"
    CustomLog "/usr/local/var/log/httpd/localhost-access.log" common
</VirtualHost>
<VirtualHost *:443>
    DocumentRoot "/Users/mathias/Sites/mixable.blog.local"
    ServerName mixable.blog.local
    SSLEngine on
    SSLCertificateFile "/usr/local/etc/httpd/cert/localhost.crt"
    SSLCertificateKeyFile "/usr/local/etc/httpd/cert/localhost.key"
</VirtualHost>

If you have additional vhost definitions, you can add the <VirtualHost *:443> part to every server name entry and use the correct paths to SSLCertificateFile and SSLCertificateKeyFile.

After changing the vhost settings, it is required to restart your Apache server!

Step 5: add the certificates to macOS

When opening a local website, the certificate should be used but you might see a NET::ERR_CERT_INVALID error. This is the case, because modern browsers/systems do not trust self-signed certificates by default. to overcome this issue, we have to add the created certificates to the macOS Keychain Access. For this, open the *.crt files in Keychain Access:

So that they are know by macOS:

And finally, update the trust settings of each certificate to “Always trust”:

You should now be able to use a secure connection between your browser and your local server:

Step 6: additional fixes

The steps above might already work for Chrome and Safari. If you have problems with Firefox, just open settings and go to Privacy & Security. Then you have to import the root certificate file RootCA.crt, so that Firefox knows about your certificate.

Join Note to Self Mail beta testing

TestFlight

You are already using Note to Self Mail and want to test new features and check out the latest improvements? The TestFlight service of Apple provides an easy way to do so. You can join TestFlight by opening this link:

Invitation link to join the TestFlight of Note to Self Mail:
https://testflight.note2selfmail.app/

What is TestFlight?

TestFlight is a service by Apple that …

Help developers test beta versions of their apps and App Clips using the TestFlight app. Download TestFlight on the App Store for iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV. […] To test beta versions of apps and App Clips using TestFlight, you’ll need to accept an email or public link invitation from the developer and have a device that you can use to test.

https://testflight.apple.com/

To learn more about TestFlight, how to get started an dhow to install and test beta apps, just open https://testflight.apple.com/.

Photo by Erol Ahmed on Unsplash

UX improvements: `enterkeyhint` to define action label for the keyboard of mobile devices

Usability

The enterkeyhint is a html attribute described in the HTML standard, which can be used to improve the context of action buttons of keyboards on mobile device.

The enterkeyhint content attribute is an enumerated attribute that specifies what action label (or icon) to present for the enter key on virtual keyboards. This allows authors to customize the presentation of the enter key in order to make it more helpful for users.

It allows the following fixed values: enter, done, go, next, previous, search and send. Let’s have a look at those values and the resulting keyboard style on iOS:

<input>

The default behavior without any value.

<input enterkeyhint=”enter”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘enter’, typically inserting a new line.

<input enterkeyhint=”done”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘done’, typically meaning there is nothing more to input and the input method editor (IME) will be closed.

<input enterkeyhint=”go”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘go’, typically meaning to take the user to the target of the text they typed.

<input enterkeyhint=”next”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘next’, typically taking the user to the next field that will accept text.

<input enterkeyhint=”previous”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘previous’, typically taking the user to the previous field that will accept text.

<input enterkeyhint=”search”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘search’, typically taking the user to the results of searching for the text they have typed.

<input enterkeyhint=”send”>

The user agent should present a cue for the operation ‘send’, typically delivering the text to its target.

Photo by Melisa Hildt on Unsplash

Android Studio: when shortcuts do not work on macOS

Compared to other IntelliJ® based software, some shortcuts in Android Studio did not work for me. For example cmd + shift + F, which should open the global search did not work.

The reason for this is the keymap setting that was set to IntelliJ IDEA Classic. Setting the keymap to macOS (as shown in the figure below) solved the issue.

Android Studio Keymap settings

PNG – deactivate interlace to avoid ‘libpng warning: Interlace handling should be turned on when using png_read_image’

I stumbled appon a warning message that was thrown by PHP when handling images with GD lib (e.g. imagecreatefrompng()). The message shown was:

libpng warning: Interlace handling should be turned on when using png_read_image

This message even exists, when deactivating ‘interlace’ with the help of:

imageinterlace($img, false);

The point is that this message is not caused by any wrong php code, it is caused by the processed images itself. The only solution is to deactivate interlace for the processed image(s). This is possible with ImageMagick. To deactivate interlace on all images of a folder, the following command can be used:

magick mogrify -interlace none *.png

I used ImageMagick on macos and installed it with with HomeBrew:

brew install imagemagick

Xcode fails to generate source files from intent definition files when using the Legacy Build System

The workaround for this problem is the following: First, add a Run Script phase before the Compile Sources phase of your target:

xcrun intentbuilderc generate -input ${SRCROOT}/PATH/TO/Intents.intentdefinition -output ${SRCROOT}/Intents -classPrefix "" -language Swift -swiftVersion 5.0

Then, add all of the generated files from the output path specified in the command above to all required targets in your project.

Source: https://developer.apple.com/documentation/xcode_release_notes/xcode_11_4_release_notes