Category: Coding / Operating Systems

Note To Self: how to quickly create tasks in Wunderlist

If you are using the mail import feature of Wunderlist, you can speed up the tasks with Note To Self Mail. The app creates tasks in Wunderlist in seconds.

Note: as Wunderlist was acquired by Microsoft and is therefore not available after 6th of May 2020, feel free to check out an alternative task manager like Trello, Evernote, Omnifocus or any other.

Thank you 6 Wunderkinder for this great app!

Setup Note To Self Mail for Wunderlist

1. Add the Wunderlist email address to Note To Self Mail

Add the email address me@wunderlist.com to Note To Self Mail. You can also set the label to “Wunderlist” or any other descriptive name.

Note To Self Mail > Settings > Add email …

2. Adjust the subject

Wunderlist uses the subject as name of a new task. Set the subject to “Use first line of note”. This ensures, that the first line is used as name and all the other text lines are moved to the description of the task.

Note To Self Mail > Settings > Add email … > Subject

Usage

Now, you can send any task to Wunderlist. With the following text …

… a new task will be created in Wunderlist …

The task was placed in the inbox list and was tagged with “home”. All the other contents of the input (line 2 up to the end) are moved to the notes of the task. That’s it!

Note To Self: how to quickly create notes in Evernote

If you are using the mail import feature of Evernote, you can improve this behaviour with Note To Self Mail. The app creates notes in Evernote in seconds.

Setup Note To Self Mail for Evernote

1. Get your Evernote email address

[…] Your Evernote email address is a unique address you can use to save emails into Evernote and looks something like this: username.5199b42@m.evernote.com. To find your Evernote email address, go to your account settings […] as described in documentation.

2. Add your Evernote email address to Note To Self Mail

Add this email address to Note To Self Mail. You can also set the label to “Evernote” or any other descriptive name.

Note To Self Mail > Settings > Add email …

3. Adjust the subject

Evernote uses the subject as a main source of a new note. Set the subject to “Use first line of note”. This ensures, that the first line is used as subject and all the other text lines are moved to the body of the note.

Note To Self Mail > Settings > Add email … > Subject

Usage

There are some shortcuts or special chars that can be used in the subject of the mail. All available features are described in Evernote’s documentation: How to save email into Evernote.

The simplest structure to create a note in Evernote is the following:

[Title of note] ![optional date for reminder] @[notebook] #[tag]

Sending a note with the following text …

… will appear in Evernote as a note …

You might notice, that the note got an alert (tomorrow) and was placed in the correct notebook and tagged with “home”. All the other contents of the input (line 2 up to the end) are moved to the notes body. That’s it!

Note To Self: new features that make your notes even faster

Note To Self Mail

The latest update 1.10 introduces a lot of new features that make your notes even faster. This includes features that improve the usability and also reduce the size of the note.

One of the main improvements is the customizable toolbar. This allows a custom positioning of the most used actions above the keyboard. There are different actions available to add and manage attachments, open the archive or send the note.

To make the notes smaller (and therefore send them faster), images can now be resized for sending. For this, a fixed size can be set or (to make things more flexible) the size of the images can be selected before sending.

Additional new features are:

  • Customizable app icon: default, dark, light
  • Preview of the note contents in share extension
  • Spanish localization … hola!
  • Support dynamic font sizes

Beside this, a large number of minor issues on layout and functionality have been fixed:

  • Updated design to handle dark mode of iOS 13
  • Fixed cursor jumping during text editing
  • Fixed layout issues when changing from landscape to porttrait (and vise versa)
  • Action extension can now handle more content types
  • Characters < and > are now displayed correctly in the HTML version of the mail

Stay tuned, there are more new features to come in the next release!

CocoaPod Workflow – eine Zusammenfassung

Eine auswführliche Beschreibung, wie man von Grund auf einen CocoaPod erstellt, findet sich unter https://guides.cocoapods.org/making/making-a-cocoapod.html. Ist der CocoaPod erstellt, dann lassen sich Updates mit wenigen Befehlen einpflegen. Hier nun die wichtigsten Schritte:

Zum Testen des Quelltextes:

$ pod lib lint

Vor dem Veröffentlichen zunächst die Versionsnummer anpassen. Dazu die .podspec bearbeiten:

# Versionsnummer anpassen
spec.version      = "0.0.1"
# Tag anpassen
spec.source       = { ... :tag => "0.0.1" }

Hinweis: Wenn der Tag in spec.source als Variable angegeben wird, dann ist es nicht notwendig, diesen immer wieder anzupassen. Der Eintrag sollte dann so aussehen: :tag => "#{spec.version}"

Den Quelltext noch einmal prüfen:

$ pod lib lint

In Git einen Tag erstellen:

$ git add -A && git commit -m "Release 0.0.1."
$ git tag '0.0.1'
$ git push --tags

Die neue Version veröffentlichen:

$ pod trunk push NAME.podspec

Hinweis: Gelegentlich werden von Xcode Meldungen (Notes) ausgegeben, die keine kritischen Fehler anzeigen, sondern nur einen Hinweis darstellen. Das kann dazu führen, dass eine Veröffentlichung fehlschlägt. Dann lässt sich eine Veröffentlichung mit dem Parameter --allow-warnings durchführen.

$ pod trunk push NAME.podspec --allow-warnings

How to set C, C++ or Fortran compiler for CMake

To use a different compiler (e.g. Intel Compiler, CLANG or PGI) or a different version then CMake uses by default, one can either set environment variables or modify
the CMakeLists.txt file.

CMake evaluates the environment variables CC for the C compiler, CXX for the C++ compiler and FC
for the Fortran compiler:

CC=/path/to/icc cmake ..
CXX=/path/to/icpc cmake ..
FC=/path/to/ifort cmake ..

For a more permanent solution, one can also edit the CMakeLists.txt file:

SET(CMAKE_C_COMPILER /path/to/pgcc)
SET(CMAKE_CXX_COMPILER /path/to/pgc++)
SET(CMAKE_FC_COMPILER /path/to/pgfortran)

BTW: The environment variables LDFLAGS, CFLAGS, CXXFLAGS or FFLAGS are also evaluated by CMake.

SPACK and Intel Parallel Studio: “error while loading shared libraries: libimf.so”

Spack is a package manager for supercomputers, Linux, and macOS. It makes installing scientific software easy. With Spack, you can build a package with multiple versions, configurations, platforms, and compilers, and all of these builds can coexist on the same machine.

However, when using the Intel Compiler as compiler, I got the following error for some packages:

 error while loading shared libraries: libimf.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

To solve this, edit your ~/.spack/linux/compilers.yaml file and set the extra_rpaths to your Intel Compiler libraries directory:

- compiler:
    environment: {}
    extra_rpaths: [/opt/intel/compilers_and_libraries_2018.1.163/linux/compiler/lib/intel64/]
    flags: {}
    modules: []
    operating_system: centos7
    paths:
      cc: /opt/intel/compilers_and_libraries_2018.1.163/linux/bin/intel64/icc
      cxx: /opt/intel/compilers_and_libraries_2018.1.163/linux/bin/intel64/icpc
      f77: /opt/intel/compilers_and_libraries_2018.1.163/linux/bin/intel64/ifort
      fc: /opt/intel/compilers_and_libraries_2018.1.163/linux/bin/intel64/ifort
    spec: intel@18.0.1
    target: x86_64